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Deformity Correction INR   0 INR  0
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Deformity Correction

Limb reconstruction surgery is the field of trauma and orthopaedic surgery that deals with the management of deformities of upper and lower limbs, reconstruction of limb defects and limb equalization techniques. The aim of limb reconstruction surgery is to achieve maximum function form a deformed limb. A range of modern surgical techniques are used to perform limb reconstruction surgery, including: Conventional plate fixation. Locking plate fixation. Intramedullary Nailing. Circular fine wire external fixators. Bone Transport and limb lengthening. Angular and/or rotational correction. Joint Arthrodesis or reconstruction. The techniques used are customized for each individual case and often involve a combination of above techniques. Common deformities treated include: Non-unions – Fractures that have failed to heal. Mal-unions – Fractures that have healed in the wrong position. Post-traumatic arthritis – arthritis of a joint following a fracture or trauma. Bone loss – Fractures that have lost bone at the time of accident or subsequent surgery. Bone infection (Osteomyelitis) – infected bone commonly associated near a site of previous injury or surgery.

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Osteotomy for Osteoarthritis of Knee INR   0 INR  0
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Osteotomy for Osteoarthritis of Knee

Osteoarthritis is essentially loss of the articular cartilage on the bone surfaces of a joint. Articular cartilage (also known as hyaline cartilage) is normally a very smooth surface with special biomechanical properties that make it particularly suitable as a bearing surface. However when the surface is disrupted, a process of breakdown commences and eventually the articular cartilage coating is worn off the bones. Unfortunately, articular cartilage has a poor capacity to heal. For treatment purposes, the knee joint can be considered to consist of three compartments. One compartment is between the patella and the femur (patellofemoral compartment), and the other two are between the tibia and femur. One is on the medial (inside) half of the knee, and the other is on the lateral (outside) half of the knee. If the osteoarthritic process is isolated to either the medial or lateral compartment, one surgical option for treating significant symptoms is an osteotomy. The principle of an osteotomy is to realign the lower limb in order to shift the line of weight bearing away from the affected half of the joint and into the good half of the joint. In other words, if the osteoarthritis is isolated to the medial compartment, the aim is to shift the line of weight bearing into the lateral compartment. The main aim of this realignment is to reduce the symptoms from the osteoarthritis and delay the need for joint replacement surgery. Realignment may also slow down the rate of its progression of the osteoarthritis. It is important to be aware that realigning the leg will result in an altered appearance of the shape of the leg. If people have medial compartment osteoarthritis, they are usually somewhat bow-legged and the osteotomy will make the leg slightly knock-kneed. The opposite applies for lateral compartment osteoarthritis. Prior to surgery the person is usually knock-kneed, but after surgery the leg is straight or slightly bow-legged. Osteotomies can be performed above or below the knee joint. For medial compartment osteoarthritis, osteotomies are most commonly performed by operating on the upper tibia. If the osteoarthritis is in the lateral compartment, the osteotomy is usually performed in the lower femur. The osteotomy procedure itself involves cutting the bone virtually completely. There are then two ways of realigning the bone. One is to take out a wedge of bone and the other is to make a cut and open up a wedge and fill it with either bone or a bone substitute. If bone is used it can either be allograft bone which is taken from a cadaver, or autograft bone which is taken from the patient, usually from the hip region. Some kind of metallic fixation device, usually a plate with screws, is then used to stabilise the osteotomy while it heals. In general there has been a trend moving away from so-called closing wedge osteotomies, where a wedge of bone is taken out, towards opening wedge osteotomies, where a cut is made and the wedge is opened. There are potential advantages and disadvantages of each technique and a decision regarding the most appropriate method will be based on your individual situation.The surgery is usually undertaken under spinal anaesthetic. You are usually admitted on the day of surgery. Most people are in hospital for 2 or 3 nights. After surgery there is usually a drain tube in the wound, which is removed the morning following surgery. Depending on your surgeon’s preference, a brace may or may not be fitted after surgery. Initially you will commence walking with the aid of crutches. You may be able to partially weight bear immediately or remain non-weight bearing for up to 6 weeks following the procedure, depending upon your surgeon’s preference. An X-ray will be taken at about 6 weeks after surgery and depending on how things are progressing, you should be able to gradually increase your weight bearing and discard your crutches over the next 2-6 weeks. COMPLICATIONS Like all surgery, osteotomies are associated with the risk of complications. The specific risks of an osteotomy include delayed healing of the osteotomy, infection, deep venous thrombosis, and incomplete pain relief. DELAYED OR NON-UNION Because a cut is made through the bone, there is effectively a fracture of the bone, which needs to heal. With opening wedge osteotomies in particular, this process can be relatively slow. If the osteotomy fails to heal, further surgery is necessary to encourage the process. INFECTION Infection is a risk of any surgery, not specifically related to osteotomy. Should infection occur, this will usually either be treated with oral antibiotics (tablets) or occasionally with intravenous antibiotics. Occasionally further surgery will be required to clean up the infection. This involves admission to hospital for a number of days during which intravenous antibiotics are given. DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT) This is a blood clot in the veins of the leg. Precautions are taken to reduce the risk and this usually involves the administration of a daily injection of a blood-thinning agent (low molecular weight heparin). Additional measures may be taken if it is felt that you are at greater risk than the average person undergoing surgery. If a venous thrombosis does occur this will usually need to be treated with anticoagulant tablets (Warfarin), which would need to be continued for at least three months. A small but nonetheless important risk for venous thrombosis is the potential of the blood clot to break off and lodge in the lungs (pulmonary embolus). This can cause significant breathing problems and very rarely can be fatal. ONGOING PAIN Osteotomy is a useful procedure for people with unicompartmental osteoarthritis who are not suitable for joint replacement, usually because of their relatively young age. However, the outcome of surgery is probably less predictable than a joint replacement. Although most patients are happy with the result, pain relief is not always complete. In the longer term the underlying osteoarthritis will progress and one can expect knee pain to return. In addition, surgery around the front of the knee is often associated with difficulty kneeling. This is more of a problem with tibial osteotomies than with femoral osteotomies. The metallic plate that is used to fix the osteotomy can be prominent, particularly in thin people. If this is the case the metallic hardware can be removed after about 12 months following surgery. This is usually done as a day or overnight case. Sometimes the metallic hardware is removed routinely after 12 months, although this is at the discretion of your surgeon. However, if a knee replacement is planned the hardware will need to be removed prior to this procedure.

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Fractures INR   0 INR  0
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Fractures

DEFINITION Oxford Dictionary Definition – the cracking or breaking of a hard object or material. A bone is fractured when there is a break in the continuity of the bone cortex. Similar terms used to describe a fracture include broken, crack, greenstick or buckle; all are used to refer to the same thing – a broken bone. The break is often described by its location (i.e. bone) and its direction (horizontal, oblique, transverse). HOW IT HAPPENS Fractures can happen in a variety of ways. Most fractures are due to trauma, while others are due to pathological conditions or overuse. Trauma can vary from high-energy injuries such as motor vehicle accidents to low energy injuries such as simple falls. TYPES OF FRACTURE Open or compound fracture – the skin overlying the fracture is also broken. Comminuted fracture – the bone is broken into multiple pieces. Avulsion fracture – a muscle or ligament pulls the bone away, fracturing it. Fracture Dislocation – when a fractured bone is associated with a dislocation of a joint. Pathological fracture – a fracture through bone weakened by an underlying condition – e.g. cancer, osteoporosis. Stress fracture – a fracture due to overuse repetitive stresses and strains. INVESTIGATION AND TREATMENT The human body heals fractures by forming a blood clot that calcifies, connecting the broken pieces of bone. For a good recovery, the bones must be held in the correct position and protected while healing occurs. This may be simply by a plaster, or if the fracture is displaced, surgery may be needed to put the bone back into the correct position for adequate healing to occur. Fractures that do not heal are called non-unions. Fractures that heal in the wrong position are called mal-unions. Non-unions and mal-unions may require further surgery to be corrected (see limb reconstruction).

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Total Hip Replacement INR   0 INR  0
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Total Hip Replacement

The operation of a total hip replacement is a well established, long lasting procedure for relieving the pain involved with hip arthritis. This type of surgery has been used effectively now for over 40 years and remains the treatment of choice to achieve an excellent quality of life for sufferers of hip arthritis.THE PROCEDURE ANAESTHETIC The type of anaesthetic that is used for the procedure will vary according to each patient’s co-existent medical conditions and also your wishes. Our group of anaesthetists are all competent in both general and regional (spinal) anaesthetics and will discuss with you prior to the procedure the benefits and risks of each technique. SURGERY Through an incision approximately 12-15cm long centred over the side of the hip and curving gently towards the buttock, the hip joint can be entered with minimal trauma to the surrounding muscles. The hip is dislocated and the femur bone is cut through its neck to expose both the pelvic and leg sides of the joint. Depending upon the quality of the bone and the age of the patient either a cemented or cementless component is fixed to the pelvis and similarly to the femur. The ball and socket mechanism of the joint is then reconstructed with either a metal on plastic (polyethylene) articulation or ceramic on ceramic articulation. Computer navigation may be used to ensure that the leg length obtained is correct and the orientation of the components is optimal to provide for maximum range of motion of the new hip. Following the surgery you will be able to mobilize fully weight bearing on the hip the day after the procedure. You will be aided by the physiotherapist and nursing staff and taught how to safely use a frame initially and then graduate onto crutches. Your hospital stay will be between 5-7 days and depending upon your home supports and progress. Most people will be able to dispense with their crutches approximately 4-6 weeks following the surgery. During this time period you should sleep flat on your back, not cross your legs and use a seat raise for the toilet. These precautions will be emphasised by the physiotherapist during your hospital stay.All our patients are routinely put on home based physiotherapy post discharge. AFTER DISCHARGE Driving the car is not allowed for 6 weeks following the surgery and car travel as a passenger should be minimised during this period. These restrictions minimise the chance of the hip dislocating whilst the muscles and soft tissues around your hip heal. At 6 weeks following the procedure you will be reviewed by your surgeon. Most patients are then given the all clear to return to recreational walking, swimming, cycling, golf, tennis, bowls, gymnasium workouts and other recreational pursuits as desired. It is not advised that you undertake running or jumping activities following a hip replacement. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS What are the risks involved with the procedure? There are general risks associated with any surgery, these are those of the anaesthetic (please speak to your anaesthetist prior to the operation), bleeding, blood clots (deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolization (PE)), infection and vascular injury. Specific to the surgery are the risks of dislocation of the hip prosthesis, leg length inequality, fracture of the pelvis or femur, wear and loosening of the implants, audible ‘squeaking’ of the articulating components (ceramics), nerve injury. When can I return to work? Most people should be able to return to work at 6 weeks post-surgery. This may be extended if you perform a job involving heavy manual labour. When can I resume sexual activity? Sexual intercourse can safely be undertaken 6 weeks following the surgery. How long do I need to keep taking pain-killing medicine for? When you leave the hospital you will be given tablet analgesia for pain. You should take this for as long as you have pain when walking or at night. Most people are able to cease analgesics by 4 weeks following the surgery. Do I need to do physiotherapy when I go home? You will be given a sheet of exercises from the physiotherapist when you leave the hospital. You should do these exercises as instructed. You do not need to visit a physiotherapist once discharged.

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